A grocery, a deli, florist, a coffee shop, or an all-purpose hardware store so you wouldn’t have to drive five miles to pick up a nut, bolt, or screw. An ethnic restaurant with tables on the sidewalk, to be welcoming. Something that says “neighborhood.” And how about lowering traffic speeds, less loitering, and attracting foot traffic beyond clients of social service agencies? Wooster Square Alder Aaron Greenberg and City Assistant Director for Comprehensive Planning Aicha Woods convened about 40 people at the Conte/West Hills School library for the session to “re-vision”  the stretch of the Grand Avenue corridor roughly from Hamilton Street and the new Mill River Crossing development to Olive Street. The City Plan Department has put this corridor and two others — lower Dixwell Avenue and lower Whalley Avenue near downtown — on a fast track for rezoning. The idea for Tuesday’s “listening session” was to solicit ideas for what new uses locals want in the neighborhood; to focus on challenges to overcome in street-scape improvements; and then to see how rezoning from the corridor’s current general business (BA) designation to other current classifications or potentially a new “tra...