With clear planning and due diligence, rural departments can successfully launch a body-worn camera program In the 1980s, a rural deputy patrolling the foothills could reduce personal liability, and enrich the quality of reports, just by dropping a voice-activated, mini-cassette recorder in a khaki shirt pocket. At the end of the shift, the cassette got labeled and dropped in a shoebox. For the cost of AAA batteries and a few packs of cassettes, cutting-edge recording technology was available to any officer who wanted it. Most of the time, no supervisors were informed, and no policies were ever written, or even considered.  Rural agencies face growing pressure to add body-worn cameras to their tech toolboxes, as officers, attorneys and the public increasingly depend upon recorded evidence. Since more than half of all U.S. law enforcement agencies serve jurisdictions with 10,000 or fewer residents, and nearly half have 10 officers or less, this is a financial and administrative concern too large to leave to inertia. Begin by finding out what the experience has been of other small agencies; advance research prevents repeating others’ mistakes.  Besides news articles and professio...